Back massage techniques

It is estimated that nearly 80 percent of the population will suffer from low back pain at some point during their lifespan. It is the biggest contributor to missed workdays and the most common cause of disability that is work-related. If you can identify the most common triggers for your low back pain, you may be able to alleviate or even prevent this debilitating illness. Especially in the case of elderly people, there should consider some back massage techniques.

What are common causes of Low Back Pain?

Have you ever heard someone bending over to pick something up off the floor and then complaining that it gave them back pain? Do you believe that the weight of the pen caused harm to your back? Low back pain can originate from something as basic as an activity you’ve done a hundred times before. Stooping down to pick up the pen was the final straw that caused the camel’s back to give way. Local irritation, inflammation, and, ultimately, a painful lesion can be brought on by a repetitive motion or activity that, in some cases, combines with previous trauma further to impair the structural stabilizers of the low back. This can happen when the low back has been previously injured.

Common Treatments for Lower Back Pain

Most individuals initially believe it to be basic muscle soreness, so they take painkillers or stretch to obtain temporary relief. Unfortunately, this is not the optimal answer, and many years may pass as the underlying issue is covered up to get out of bed. Eventually, the individual visits their physician, who orders imaging that reveals a much more severe structural problem than normal muscle soreness. It is nearly hard to harm a muscle without also causing injury to a ligament, disc, or nerve. Even if the condition was caused only by repetitive actions, it always affects the complete functional unit. Muscle pain is a symptom that accompanies nearly all types of spinal lesions, and our brain is unable to distinguish between muscle pain and a herniated disc, tumor, or deteriorated joint.

How to give a back massage?

The following are some helpful tips that how to give a back massage.

  • First, you should start massaging your back.
  • Take the next step and use gliding strokes.
  • Third, rely on your body weight as resistance.
  • Fourth, squeeze the muscles on either side of your spine harder.

In the next Section, we are going to discuss in detail how to give a back massage as well as a lower back massage.

Lower back massage techniques for elderly

Lying on one’s stomach for a back massage can be excruciating for elderly people, and in some cases, it’s not even possible. An excellent alternative would be for them to lie on their side. The elderly person will be able to relax in this position, and it will also provide you unrestricted access to the back of the elderly people. Following are some lower back massage techniques.

  • Ask the elderly people whose side of the bed they want to sleep on, and then position them on it according to their preference.
  • You can apply a lotion, oil, or essential aromatherapy oils to your back before giving yourself a massage. A blend of relaxing essential oils like lavender and geranium can produce excellent benefits.
  • Put some lotion or oil on your hands, and then rub it in.
  • Put some oil on the senior’s back, then spend ten to twenty seconds spreading it all over, allowing them time to get used to your touch.
  • Move your hands slowly up and down their back, avoiding their spine the entire while.
  • Now, move circularly across the back while applying the friction technique.
  • It all begins at the very base of the back.
  • Stick your thumb out and press it against the instrument’s back.
  • To perform the friction technique, tighten your fists and place them behind your back, knuckles down, on either side of your spine.
  • It all begins at the very base of the back.
  • Extend your thumb, so it is pressed against the back of the instrument.
  • Now, push your fist up the back on either side of the spine while keeping it gripped.
  • As you move up the back, press your thumb into your back muscles.
  • Be sure to steer clear of the spine.
  • When you get to the base of the neck, lift your hands off the ground and start the exercise at the bottom of the back.
  • When you have completed this activity for a few minutes, proceed to do the same technique in a circular manner all over the back.

Lower back massage precautions for the elderly

When massaging elderly people, there are a few important safety considerations you should take. Of course, if your older loved one has a serious or mild medical condition, you shouldn’t massage them. Instead, look for a licensed massage therapist who can help you out.

  • If someone has a special problem such as knee pain, open wounds, osteoporosis, or other specific demands, they should only engage the services of a licensed massage therapist. Alternatively, you might see your physician to determine if a simple home massage employing fundamental techniques is safe.
  • It is essential to recognize that elderly individuals have trouble maintaining certain positions, such as lying on their stomachs. The most effective massage positions for elders are face-up, side-lying, and seated.
  • If the elder is fragile, thirty to forty minutes is sufficient for a massage. If they are stronger and desire a longer massage, it is best not to exceed 60 minutes.
  • Seniors’ skin tends to become dry, so use a blend of calming essential oils and aromatherapy oils. Avoid performing massages without gel, lotion, or oil.
  • If the senior has been bedridden for an extended time, you must consider the risk that massage can dislodge blood clots, which might result in serious health complications.
  • If the senior asks for a professional massage, choose a Swedish or soothing massage and avoid modalities such as Deep Tissue massage and Sports massage, which, as you can imagine, give a great deal of force and depth.
  • Idealistically, sessions should last no longer than 30 minutes. And only utilize the spots indicated here, as they are safe.

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