Diabetes Care

Home Care in Anderson, Beaufort, Greenville, Oconee, Pickens, & Spartanburg

Diabetes is a disease that inhibits the body's capacity to metabolize blood glucose, also called blood sugar. There are numerous forms of diabetes, each of which is treated differently.

Diabetes can cause a buildup of sugars in the blood, raising the risk of dangerous complications, such as stroke and heart disease, if it is not well managed.

There are various types of diabetes, and the management of the ailment varies on the style. Not all types of diabetes are caused by obesity and sedentary lifestyles. Some have been present since childhood.

Type 1, 2, and gestational diabetes are the most prevalent kinds of diabetes, discussed in greater depth below. Less prevalent forms of diabetes included monogenic diabetes and diabetes associated with cystic fibrosis.

Type 1 diabetes

Type 1 diabetes, often called juvenile diabetes, arises when the body fails not to manufacture insulin. Insulin is the hormone responsible for metabolizing blood sugar for utilization throughout the body. During childhood, a person with type 1 diabetes could be diagnosed.

People with type 1 diabetes need to take insulin daily. Individuals may administer insulin by injection or insulin pump.

There is no known treatment for type 1 diabetes. Once a person has been diagnosed with diabetes, they need to monitor blood sugar levels, take insulin, and adjust their lifestyle to manage the condition effectively.

People with type 1 diabetes who successfully manage their blood sugar levels can prevent major problems. The following are common complications:

  • ketoacidosis
  • nerve damage
  • problems with the eyes
  • increased risk of skin infections
  • renal problems
  • cardiovascular disease
  • foot issues, including tingling
  • Stroke
  • high blood pressure

Type 2 diabetes

Individuals who have type 2 diabetes cannot adequately produce or utilize insulin. According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), this is the most prevalent form of diabetes and is strongly associated with obesity.

A person with type 2 diabetes could or might not require insulin. In many instances, medication, in addition to modifications in diet and exercise, can help control the disease.

Everyone, including toddlers and adults, is susceptible to developing type 2 diabetes. These are the most prevalent risk factors for the development of diabetes:

  • age 45 or older
  • overweight
  • family history

Gestational diabetes

Gestational diabetes arises when a patient becomes insulin-resistant during pregnancy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), between 2 and 10% of each year's pregnancies are affected by gestational diabetes. Those overweight before conception has an increased risk of having the disease.

According to the CDC, approximately fifty percent of women with gestational diabetes would subsequently acquire type 2 diabetes.

Individuals can take action to manage the illness during pregnancy. These consist of the following:

  • staying active
  • monitoring the growth and development of the fetus
  • adjusting their diet
  • monitoring blood sugar levels
  • premature birth
  • increased birth weight
  • blood sugar issues with the newborn, which typically clear up within a few days
  • increased risk of the baby developing type 2 diabetes later in life

Prevention

There is no way to prevent type 1 diabetes.

However, individuals can take preventative measures against type 2 diabetes. Several methods for preventing type 2 diabetes include: Credible Source:

  • sustaining a healthy weight
  • A diet low in added sugars, saturated fats, and processed foods.
  • exercising regularly

To lessen the chance of getting gestational diabetes, a woman should maintain a healthy weight before conception.

While these strategies can help, it is crucial to recognize that type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes can still occur.

How insulin problems develop

The specific causes of type 1 diabetes are unknown. However, there are clearer causes for insulin sensitivity, which can progress to type 2 diabetes.

Insulin enables glucose from a person's meal to enter their cells and provide energy. Typically, insulin resistance results from the usual Trusted Source cycle:

  1. A person's genes or environment increase the likelihood that they cannot create more insulin to cover the amount of glucose or sugar consumed.
  2. The body attempts to produce additional insulin to digest excess blood sugar.
  3. The pancreas cannot meet the increasing demands, and the extra blood sugar begins to circulate, causing harm.
  4. Over time, insulin's ability to transport glucose into cells diminishes, but blood sugar levels keep rising.

Insulin resistance develops progressively in people with type 2 diabetes. This is why doctors frequently prescribe adopting a healthier lifestyle to slow or halt that cycle.

Exercise and diet tips

If a physician diagnoses a patient with diabetes, they will frequently propose lifestyle modifications to aid in weight control and overall health.

A physician may recommend a diabetic or pre-diabetic patient to a nutritionist. A specialist can assist people with diabetes in leading a healthy, active lifestyle and managing the disease.

Included in the measures a person with diabetes might take to preserve health are:

Eating a diet rich in fresh, wholesome foods, such as whole grains, fruits, vegetables, lean proteins, low-fat dairy products, and healthy fat sources, such as nuts.

  • Avoiding high-sugar foods which produce empty calories or energy with no other nutritional value, such as sweetened beverages, fried foods, and sweet sweets.
  • Abstaining from excessive alcohol use or limiting alcohol consumption to less than a drink per day for women and two drinks per day for men.
  • At least 30 min of physical activity each day on a minimum of five per week, such as walking, aerobics, cycling, or swimming.
  • Recognize low blood sugar symptoms when exercising, such as vertigo, confusion, weakness, and profuse sweating.

Using insulin

All individuals with type 1 diabetes and some with type 2 diabetes require insulin to prevent their blood sugar levels from rising too high.

There are numerous forms of insulin, the most categorized by the duration of their effects. There are rapid, fast, intermediate, long, and mixed-action insulins.

Some individuals need long-acting insulin to keep their blood sugar levels consistently low. Others may utilize rapid-acting insulin or a mixture of insulin types. Regardless of the style, a person will often monitor their blood sugar levels to calculate the amount of insulin required.

A person can use a blood glucose monitor, which includes pricking their skin, or a combination of a continuous blood glucose monitor (CGM) and skin pricks to check their blood sugar levels.

A CGM takes normal glucose levels throughout the day. They can assist a patient with any necessary medication modifications.

Self-monitoring is the only method for determining blood sugar levels. Assuming the class based on bodily sensations can be harmful until a person suspects a dangerously low blood sugar level and believes they require an immediate dosage of glucose.

From establishing a healthy lifestyle to managing blood sugar and insulin levels, living with diabetes is challenging. While there is currently no cure for Diabetes, the disease can be effectively managed with medications and a change in diet and exercise. If left untreated, however, it can be a debilitating disease.

Diabetes in-home care offers a solution to lessen the impact the disease has on one’s health and well-being. The caregiver prepares meals for the client in accordance with a meal plan set by a doctor, home health nurse, or nutritionist (e.g. low sodium, low cholesterol, low fat, vegetarian, or vegan), manages medications, and promotes physical activity. Family & nursing care’s specially trained caregivers provide support, education, and assistance to diabetic patients and their families. Diabetes patients who would benefit from home care are those with frequent hospital admissions, diabetic wounds or foot ulcers, multiple new medications, or underlying disease processes that may contribute to poor diabetic control.

Why is home care for diabetic seniors so important? Home care is an amazing service that allows many seniors to live independently, while also giving themselves and their families peace of mind. Home care is an excellent option for diabetic seniors because many suffering from diabetes are still mentally resilient and independent, but due to the unique complications of their disease, are unable to manage all of their health needs. Here are some of the reasons why home care is a great option for diabetic seniors.

1. Assistance with Eyesight and Mobility

Diabetes affects the eyes and nerve endings. Many seniors who have lived with diabetes for a lifetime have issues walking due to damaged nerves in the feet, and issues with sight due to damage to the eyes. This can impede their day-to-day activities, and put them at a greater risk of falling. That is where home care comes in. Home care workers can help their clients get around where they need to go, and assist them with the everyday functions that may be challenging, such as reading mail, making meals, or transportation. 

2. Medication Management

Diabetes is controlled through the use of insulin. Tracking a senior's blood sugar level is a full time job. Many seniors are capable of keeping track the majority of the time, but if their levels go too high or too low, it affects brain function and causes confusion. A disoriented senior may not be able to contact someone for help in time to get their blood sugar under control. A home care worker gives peace of mind for those with diabetes. The caregiver assists with medication monitoring, identifies symptoms of low or high blood sugar levels, and can get help in an emergency situation.

3. Improve Quality of Life 

When there is quality life it means happiness, comfort and participation in life. At home care of your diabetic senior means they get to stay in their home, have company, garden, cook, come and go. They can transport to appointments, go to a movie, join a club, shop, meet a friend for lunch or just talk a walk. Quality of life is freedom to live as we like while maintaining health, loving relationships and individual pursuit of happiness.

4. Monitoring Blood Glucose

Regularly checking blood glucose is important to managing diabetes. However, decreases in dexterity or vision make it hard for some seniors to check their own blood sugars. Home health providers can help seniors check their blood sugars and teach them how to overcome these difficulties to check it themselves. They can also review blood glucose logs to help their health care provider make adjustments to their medications.

5. Meal Preparation

A healthy diet is important to managing blood sugar levels. Seniors with mobility, vision, budget, or transportation difficulties may not be able to prepare their own healthy meals. Home health providers help seniors plan appropriate menus, take them grocery shopping, and prepare meals. They also teach seniors about healthy eating to manage their diabetes.

can transport to appointments, go to a movie, join a club, shop, meet a friend for lunch or just talk a walk. Quality of life is freedom to live as we like while maintaining health, loving relationships and individual pursuit of happiness.

6. Monitoring Blood Glucose

Regularly checking blood glucose is important to managing diabetes. However, decreases in dexterity or vision make it hard for some seniors to check their own blood sugars. Home health providers can help seniors check their blood sugars and teach them how to overcome these difficulties to check it themselves. They can also review blood glucose logs to help their health care provider make adjustments to their medications.

7. Meal Preparation

A healthy diet is important to managing blood sugar levels. Seniors with mobility, vision, budget, or transportation difficulties may not be able to prepare their own healthy meals. Home health providers help seniors plan appropriate menus, take them grocery shopping, and prepare meals. They also teach seniors about healthy eating to manage their diabetes.

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